Journal Articles on Lexiles

Journal Articles on Lexiles

 
  • Student Readiness for Post-Secondary Endeavors  

    Abstract:
    The purpose of this research was to elucidate a continuum of postsecondary text difficulty and to use it to quantify gaps between the text difficulty of high school textbooks and various reading materials likely to be encountered in the most widely chosen postsecondary domains of endeavor--the university, the workplace, the military and citizenship in general. Wide-ranging samples of texts were identified to represent the typical texts found in each domain of endeavor. Using The Lexile Framework [R] for Reading, each text was analyzed to produce a Lexile measure of text difficulty. The resulting 1730 text measures were statistically analyzed and summarized to show the differences in distributions of text difficulty across the identified domains of postsecondary endeavor. The results indicate a systematic continuum of increasing text demand that extends from high school texts to university texts. Furthermore, there were statistically significant increases in text demand from high school texts to citizenship materials, workplace materials, community college texts and university texts. Whether a student aspires to postsecondary education, a job, the military, or just to be an informed citizen, the reading ability required is likely to be higher than what is typically required in high school based on texts that are widely used in this country. This finding is consistent with much of the extant literature about readiness for postsecondary endeavors. However it is dramatically distinct from that literature in applying a more unified theoretical framework and in producing results that are comparable across the investigated domains. It gives new insight to possible methods to address student readiness. For example, if the gap in student readiness is really a gap in text difficulty rather than a result of student failure to learn what has been taught in high school, then any policy solution should address the text gap instead of providing (remedial) "solutions" for a perceived gap in student ability. Furthermore, because reading ability is generally measured with many different scales it currently is not possible to investigate a performance gap with the definitive results observed in this study for text difficulty. Therefore, this paper also calls for a more systematic effort to identify and quantify the reading ability gap in terms of a metric for both ability and textual difficulty. The advantage would be more meaningful measurement of reading ability and findings that are more conducive to instructional and policy actions. (Contains 2 tables and 1 figure)

     

  • Instructional Uses of the Lexile Framework.

    Abstract:
    The Lexile Framework provides teachers with tools to help them link the results of reading assessment with subsequent instruction, focuses on appropriate-level curriculum for readers at all educational levels, and is designed to be flexible enough to use alongside any type of reading program. Suggested areas for application of this system include: (1) monitoring reading program goals; (2) making decisions about reading programs; (3) communicating with parents to include them in education; (4) helping students set appropriate learning goals; (5) challenging the best readers; (6) improving students' abilities. Contains 5 references.

  • Measuring Reading Comprehension with the Lexile Framework. 

    Abstract:
    This paper shows how the concept of general objectivity can be used to improve behavioral science measurement, particularly as it applies to the Lexile Framework, a tool for objectively measuring reading comprehension. It begins with a dialogue between a physicist and a psychometrician that details some of the differences between physical science and behavioral science measurement. Building on these distinctions, a definition of measurement is offered that describes what goes on in the physical sciences and represents an attainable ideal of what should go on in the behavioral sciences. This definition of measurement is formalized in an equation that turns out to be the Rasch model, with the important difference that indicant calibrations are obtained via theory, not data. Through the use of theory-based calibrations, a generally objective estimation of the measure parameter in the Rasch model is achieved. The paper then examines the differences between local objectivity obtained with the Rasch model and general objectivity obtained with a theory-enhanced version of that model. Next, it reports on a 10-year study of reading comprehension measurement that implemented the concept of general objectivity through the development of the Lexile Framework. Finally, it summarizes several of the benefits of objective measurement and general objectivity as they might be realized in the measurement of constructs other than reading comprehension. Contains 52 references, and 4 tables and a figure of data.

     

  • Readability and Reading Ability

    Abstract:
    This document discusses the measurement of reading ability and the readability of books by application of the Lexile framework. It begins by stating the importance of uniform measures. It then discusses the history of reading ability testing, based on the assumption that no researcher has been able to measure more than one kind of reading ability. The concept of "lexiles" is introduced as a measure for readability which uses word familiarity and sentence length. The Lexile formula is explained, and processes for using the Lexile concept and applying it to reading instruction are discussed at length. The paper ends by relating Lexile scores to jobs, amount of education, and income. Contains 44 references, 2 notes, and 5 tables.

     

  • What We Know About Adolescent Reading

    Abstract:

    Reading proficiency has historically been valued as the fundamental enabling competency in public education in the minds of parents, educators, and the general public. The study of reading instruction and literacy has been exhaustive, so we will focus on a few broad themes that we have frequently observed in the course of our research and during our school improvement efforts with some of America’s most  inspiring and promising high schools and middle schools.\

     

  • A Content Comparison of the NAEP and PIRLS Fourth-Grade Reading Assessments.

    Abstract:
    In 1991, the United States participated in the International Evaluation of Educational Achievement (IEA) Reading Literacy Study that assessed the reading literacy of fourth-grade students in 32 countries. When a new study of fourth-grade reading literacy was being planned for 2001, the IEA decided to create a new assessment: Progress in International Reading Literacy Study (PIRLS). This Working Paper compares the frameworks, texts, and items of these two international studies. The paper is divided into the following sections: Executive Summary; Introduction; Definitions of Reading; Purposes for Reading; Reading Passages; Distribution of Item Types in NAEP and PIRLS; Reading Processes Assessed by NAEP and PIRLS; To What Extent Do NAEP and PIRLS Measure Similar Skills?; Detailed View of Cross-Classification; and Conclusion. Appended are: Expert Panel Members; Example Passages; Readability and Lexile Analysis; and Classification of Items. (Contains 7 references, 14 tables, and 4 figures.)

     

  • The Lexile Scale in Theory and Practice. Final Report. 

    Abstract:
    A three-part correlational study examined the explanatory power of the Lexile theory of reading comprehension, which was based on the semantic and syntactic components of prose. Correlations were performed between the item difficulties of nine nationally normed reading comprehension tests and computer generated difficulties which were reported in Lexiles. A correlation of 0.93 was obtained between observed and theoretical scores. A second test was performed in which the rank order of basal series units were correlated with Lexile ratings of text difficulty. A correlation of 0.99 was obtained. A third test was performed in which the correlations between test item difficulties and Lexile ratings were compared with correlations derived from nine measures of readability. Results indicated that while the Lexile equation produced better correlations on average, analysis of variance revealed that the Lexile ratings did not provide a significantly better explanation of the test item difficulties than the readability formulas. Results indicated that the Lexile theory does account for a significant portion of the difficulty of continuous prose and can be used to generate normative and criterion interpretations of a score which would facilitate the direct matching of student abilities with reading materials of appropriate difficulty. (Two figures and 10 tables of data are included; 42 references are attached.)

     

  • The Objective Measurement of Reading Comprehension- In Response to Technical Questions Raised by the California Department of Education Technical Study Group.

    Abstract:
    This document discusses in depth the theoretical background of the Lexile Framework, which is based on the assumption that reading comprehension is the best predictor of success in higher education and job performance, and that it is the most tested construct in education. The first section defines measurement and differentiates between specific and general objectivity. The second section explains the Lexile Framework, and discusses: the lexile theory, the semantic component, the syntactic component, the calibration equation, the lexile scale, testing the lexile equation, interpreting lexile measures, forecasting comprehension rates, and ergonomics of the lexile framework. The third section discusses measurement error, including the components: text measure error, reader measure error, comprehension forecast error, linking standard errors, and how errors combine. Contains 8 tables, 2 figures, 3 notes, and 49 references


Website by SchoolMessenger Presence. © 2017 West Corporation. All rights reserved.